In Bitcoin Investieren 2020: Bitcoin kaufen oder nicht?

Bitcoin datadir location storage

When bitcoin-qt is first run it asks where to put the datadir, and offers the default location ~/.bitcoin or lets you choose. Where is this choice stored as no bitcoin.conf is generated? How does it know on subsequent launches to look in the custom location?
submitted by varikonniemi to BitcoinCore [link] [comments]

Use an env_file and use the variables in that inside the "environment" block

Hi guys
Just fell in a docker rabbit hole, I am completely changing my deployment flow.
Quick question, is it possable to do something like this?:
So use an env_file and use the variables in that inside the "environment" block. hence: rpcusername=${BITCOIN_RPCUSERNAME}

Part of my docker-compose.yml:
bitcoind: restart: unless-stopped image: btcpayservebitcoin:0.20.1 env_file: - production.env environment: BITCOIN_WALLETDIR: "/walletdata" BITCOIN_EXTRA_ARGS: | rpcport=43782 rpcbind=0.0.0.0:43782 rpcusername=${BITCOIN_RPCUSERNAME} rpcpassword=${BITCOIN_RPCPASSWORD} port=39388 whitelist=0.0.0.0/0 zmqpubrawblock=tcp://0.0.0.0:28332 zmqpubrawtx=tcp://0.0.0.0:28333 zmqpubhashblock=tcp://0.0.0.0:28334 txindex=1 expose: - "43782" - "39388" - "28332" - "28333" - "28334" volumes: - "bitcoin_datadir:/data" - "bitcoin_wallet_datadir:/walletdata"
Do I maybe have other options maybe? I dont want my settings to be in 2 places.
submitted by pocketnl to docker [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-qt datadir alternative storage location

I tried asking this in the bitcoincore sub yesterday, but it only has a handful of members and got no answers, so i now try here.
When bitcoin-qt is first started, it asks for the location of datadir. If it is set to a custom location, it remembers it on subsequent launches. Where is this location stored, as no bitcoin.conf is generated in the default location, and i have not seen any other documentation to specify datadir except command line option and bitcoin.conf file?
submitted by varikonniemi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoind over tor. A miniguide from personal experience (I'm not an expert)

The problem

Light SPV clients are today the best solution to use bitcoin on a mobile without leaving your secret key in the hands of a company but:

Mitigation

1) With many SPV light clients today you can connect to nodes you choose and they can so be either trusted or even controlled by you (es: one node at home and one node at the office)
2) If this connection is over Tor you can avoid being eavesdropped by someone being it a criminal or a malicious or censoring third part
3) Your transactions are not linked to a given or known IP address

The setup

1) Download and synchronize the blockchain with your node
mv BitcoinDatadipeers.dat /tmp 
this will move the file peers.dat to /tmp (which is better for your privacy).
2) From your tor setup directory
cp torrc.sample torrc tor --hash-password "" ->  
to set up a control port and a password for an external application in our case is bitcoin
https://stem.torproject.org/tutorials/the_little_relay_that_could.html
3) add these lines to your torrc file

torrc

ControlPort 9051 CookieAuthentication 1 HashedControlPassword  
add these lines to your bitcoin.conf file

bitcoin.conf

 proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 onlynet=onion listenonion=1 discover=0 torcontrol=127.0.0.1:9051 torpassword= 
4) start tor
tor 
5) start bitcoind
bitcoind -daemon 
On your mobile setup your SPV client to run on Tor.
Greenbits works well with Orbot.
Tell your client to connect via SPV to your new onion address.
Bonus: you don't need to open any port on your router at home or at the office.
This is a mini straight forward guide by a non expert.
I encourage you to study the documentation at
https://www.torproject.org/docs/documentation.html.en
as well as:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/mastedoc/tor.md
submitted by gabridome to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-qt datadir alternative storage location (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

Bootstrapping a node using the $datadir from another node

I'm looking to automate setting up a new node and making use of the existing blockchain from another node.
Does anyone know a procedure I can follow to get a new node running using the existing $datadir contents I already have on another node? i.e. which files can I copy from the tree output below to a new host, and what order do I need to copy the data/start the service?
/bitcoin-datadir ├── banlist.dat ├── bitcoind.pid ├── blocks │ ├── blk00000.dat │ ├── [...] │ ├── blk01093.dat │ ├── index │ │ ├── 085604.ldb │ │ ├── [...] │ │ ├── 121922.ldb │ │ ├── CURRENT │ │ ├── LOCK │ │ ├── LOG │ │ └── MANIFEST-116359 │ ├── rev00000.dat │ ├── [...] │ └── rev01093.dat ├── chainstate │ ├── 602706.ldb │ ├── [...] │ ├── 605755.ldb │ ├── CURRENT │ ├── LOCK │ ├── LOG │ └── MANIFEST-556162 ├── database │ ├── log.0000000001 │ ├── [...] │ └── log.0000000006 ├── db.log ├── debug.log ├── fee_estimates.dat ├── mempool.dat ├── peers.dat └── wallet.dat 
Any advice appreciated u/nullc, etc
submitted by woodahusan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help: Bitcoin Core does not auto start in Ubuntu with -datadir option

Please can someone help me out?
I have installed Ubuntu in VirtualBox to host Bitcoin Core. In VirtualBox I assigned a special disk with the blockchain. I am however new to Ubuntu. I am a Windows crack.
When I start bitcoin core from a terminal command prompt like:
bitcoin-qt -datadir=/media//Blockchain
then Bitcoin core starts correctly. "" is my username to login to Ubuntu. "Blockchain" is how the disk is named in VirtualBox. The host system is Windows 10.
However when I configure this command in the 'startup applications' of Ubuntu to start bitcoin core automatically when Ubuntu starts, I get the error message the path cannot be found.
While I am writing this post, I think it may be possible Ubuntu did not logged me in under username yet when auto starting bitcoin core, but this is a wild quess.
Is there an Ubuntu crack who can help me out please?
submitted by pdlvw to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

u/theymos: "I can't recommend running BIP148 software. Doing so will likely cause you to break away from the real Bitcoin currency on the flag day, create a mess of your datadir which you'll need to manually clean up, and theoretically there are opportunities for losses due to counterfeit BTC." Wow!

submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

@gpuhot: @bitcoin_v I use separate datadirs already 😉

submitted by AltCash to altcash [link] [comments]

Help: Bitcoin Core does not auto start in Ubuntu with -datadir option /r/Bitcoin

Help: Bitcoin Core does not auto start in Ubuntu with -datadir option /Bitcoin submitted by SimilarAdvantage to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bootstrapping a node using the $datadir from another node /r/Bitcoin

Bootstrapping a node using the $datadir from another node /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

u/theymos: "I can't recommend running BIP148 software. Doing so will likely cause you to break away from the real Bitcoin currency on the flag day, create a mess of your datadir which you'll need to manually clean up, and theoretically there are opportunities for losses due to counterfeit BTC." Wow!

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Running full node, datadir on nas /r/bitcoin_unlimited

Running full node, datadir on nas /bitcoin_unlimited submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core problem: "Incorrect or no genesis block found. Wrong datadir for network?"

So I experienced a problem that others were also having where av software (avast) thinks some files (specifically, in my case, blk00129.dat, 1774506.log, 1774710.sst, 177415.sst, and 1774760.sst) within Bitcoin Core are viruses. Avast automatically quarantines the files. After reading about the problem, I tried to restore the files, thinking that would get me back up and running. Instead, I get the error "Incorrect or no genesis block found. Wrong datadir for network?" The files which were quarantined, and supposedly restored, are not in Library/Application Support/Bitcoin (Mac OS X). Actually, the .dat file is there but the chainstate files and log file are now different. Incidentally, blk00000.dat is still there, which I assume is the genesis block the error is referencing. Any help? Did some googling and found people having this error with altcoins but couldn't find pertinent solution. Thanks.
submitted by simorq to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

HowTo: Masterchest Wallet with Alternate Datadir for Bitcoin-QT

submitted by i-am-adam-i-approve to mastercoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anatomy of the Bitcoin Node filesystem

There are man explanations like this, but this one is mine.
Just in case anyone was curious. I dug up some good posts on this and thought I'd distill it as best I could. I'll be using Windows file separators, but fee free to change them in your head.
If you name a -datadir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to %APPDATA%\Bitcoin
If you name a -blocksdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to
If you name a -walletdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to \wallets or just if the wallets subdirectory doesn't exist.
  • \wallet.dat - The wallet file with private keys and UTXOs
  • \db.log - Database log of access to wallet
Note that -datadir, -blocksdir and -walletdir can all point to different storage. The things you need to keep in mind:
  1. -datadir should be your FASTEST storage
  2. -blocksdir should be your LARGEST storage
  3. -walletdir should be your most SECURE storage
As a footnote, -testnet will throw a testnet3\ in everything, and -walletdir would be assumed to refer to test.walletdir
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Batch script to create pruned block data from full block data

TLDR; Produce a pruned block directory from a full block directory without copying any extra block data
I have a full node, but at times I want to run in a VM or on a RPi or something. Normally I have to clone my whole 300 GB block directory, enable pruning, then point bitcoin-qt.exe to the clone to finally arrive at a small 4 GB datadir. I found it frustrating that I was doing this 295 GB of pointless copy operations since once I enable pruning, the old blocks are discarded. I was also discouraged at the fact that .\Bitcoin\testnet3\blocks\blk00186.dat is different (by checksum) in a pruned and non-pruned directory.
So I finally came up with an answer. Basically, I copy over the latest few blk*.dat and rev*.dat files, then just make empty copies of the other blk*.dat and rev*.dat files. Then once bitcoin-qt.exe launches, it discards the empty files and rewrites the few files it needs. For Windows, it looks something like this:
set /a "sum=0" for /f %%I in ('dir /s /b /o:-n %full_blk%\blk*.dat') do ( set size=%%~zI set blkdat=%%~nxI set revdat=!blkdat:blk=rev! if !sum! GTR !pruned_mb! ( echo.> %pruned_blk%\!blkdat! echo.> %pruned_blk%\!revdat! ) else ( copy %full_blk%\!blkdat! %pruned_blk%\!blkdat! copy %full_blk%\!revdat! %pruned_blk%\!revdat! ) set /a "sum=!sum! -1 + !size!/(1024*1024)" )
I can stamp out a pruned blocks directory from my full blocks directory in seconds. Much easier... well for me.
Here's the source, but no guarantees. Just food for thought.
 
Update: I had originally thought to symlink the unused files, but turns out they are never read at all, so I can just dummy them out.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Anatomy of the Bitcoin Node filesystem

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by brianddk [link]
There are man explanations like this, but this one is mine.
Just in case anyone was curious. I dug up some good posts on this and thought I'd distill it as best I could. I'll be using Windows file separators, but fee free to change them in your head.
If you name a -datadir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to %APPDATA%\Bitcoin
If you name a -blocksdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to
  • \blocks\blk*.dat - The raw block data
  • \blocks\rev*.dat - The Undo files. List of spent UTXOs for each block
If you name a -main.walletdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to \wallets or just if the wallets subdirectory doesn't exist.
  • \wallet.dat - The wallet file with private keys and UTXOs
  • \db.log - Database log of access to wallet
Note that -datadir, -blocksdir and -main.walletdir can all point to different storage. The things you need to keep in mind:
  1. -datadir should be your FASTEST storage
  2. -blocksdir should be your LARGEST storage
  3. -main.walletdir should be your most SECURE storage
As a footnote, testnet will through a testnet3\ in everything, and would require a -test.walletdir switch to set the wallet directory.
brianddk your post has been copied because one or more comments in this topic have been removed. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please send a message using [this link].
[deleted comment]
submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

WellThatSucks - Bitcoin core wants to download every block again

WellThatSucks - Bitcoin core wants to download every block again submitted by StalyCelticStu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I built lightningd, and now am running it, and running into this problem where bcli seems to be returning wrong json (with bitcoind running too)

So I have confirmed that the bitcoin-cli.exe is being invoked, with the arguments shown. But I am not sure why this error is coming up. If I run bitcoin-cli.exe from command line, I can easily get replies for command like getblockchaininfo, which confirms that bitcoind is running.

Here is what I get as output of lightningd command:
2020-08-30T17:35:53.634Z INFO plugin-bcli: bitcoin-cli initialized and connected to bitcoind. /uslocal/bin/../libexec/c-lightning/plugins/bcli error: bad response to getrawblockbyheight (bad 'result' field), response was {"jsonrpc":"2.0","id":8,"error":{"code":400,"message":"bitcoin-cli.exe -datadir=G:\\\\.bitcoin -rpcconnect=127.0.0.1 -rpcport=8332 -rpcuser=... -rpcpassword=... getblockhash 646000: bad JSON: bad blockhash (00000000000000000001ef19be9c9879c6e9aa6241a096f543109e2a34397936\r\n)"} } 
Not sure why I am seeing this problem.
Update: I got it running. Now I see this
2020-08-30T23:45:47.611Z INFO plugin-bcli: bitcoin-cli initialized and connected to bitcoind. 2020-08-30T23:45:48.728Z INFO lightningd: -------------------------------------------------- 2020-08-30T23:45:48.729Z INFO lightningd: Server started with public key 03c7505d1ac56441f234025cd348743cddff147f9356e6296820d5e95d1a56b29d, alias GREENTOLL (color #03c750) and lightningd v0.9.0-197-gdd8cd81-modded 
I've no clue what I am doing, but will continue digging more.
submitted by parakite to lightningnetwork [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
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Bitcoin und Blockchains - Dirk Jäckel (Lightning Talk Jugend hackt 2016) Bitcoin: Kurs-Rallye durch Zahlungs-Revolution? bitcoin比特币核心+移动硬盘,使用冷存储方法教程。(物理隔绝的方式方法) Mit Salz auf Mücken schießen? Neue Gadgets gegen nervige ... YouTube

Bitcoin Core normally puts all of its data into one data directory, but oftentimes it is useful to adjust things so that certain of these files go elsewhere.. If your data directory is on a magnetic disk: Moving chainstate for improved speed. Bitcoin Core's overall speed is significantly affected by the random-access speed of the contents of the chainstate directory; if your data directory is ... If you want to store them in D:\BitcoinData then click on "Properties" of a shortcut to bitcoin-qt.exe and add -datadir=D:\BitcoinData at the end as an example: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bitcoin\bitcoin-qt.exe" -datadir=d:\BitcoinData Start Bitcoin, now you will see all the files are created in the new data directory. Linux . By default Bitcoin will put its data here: ~/.bitcoin/ You need to do ... Anleitung: einfach in Bitcoin Investieren in drei Schritten Schritt 1: Konto bei Trading Plattform eröffnen. Bevor man in Bitcoin investieren kann, muss man sich als erstes ein Konto bei einer Trading Plattform erstellen, die die Währung unterstützt.. Dabei fällt unsere Wahl auf eToro.Hier ist die Kontoeröffnung besonders einfach und benötigt noch nicht einmal eine Verifizierung bei ... Bitcoin Core runs as a full network node and maintains a local copy of the block chain. This data independence improves wallet privacy and security. Unlike some SPV wallets that leak addresses to peers, Bitcoin Core stores all transactions locally.With local access to the complete set of headers and transactions, Bitcoin Core can use full verification to tell when peers lie about payments. I am trying to change the data directory used by bitcoind and I am uder the impression that the command -datadir was removed as I can't find it with bitcoin-cli help, when I try to use it I get Too few parameters and bitcoin-cli help datadir says datadir doesn't exist. I need to specify a directory that is not on the root partition, how to do it ? Also why bitcoin core is so user unfriendly ...

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Bitcoin und Blockchains - Dirk Jäckel (Lightning Talk Jugend hackt 2016)

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