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Blowing the lid off the CryptoNote/Bytecoin scam (with the exception of Monero) - Reformatted for Reddit

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
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Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
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See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
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May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
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pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
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This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
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A Non-Comprehensive List of some Passive Beermoney Sites

Non-Comprehensive because it's certainly not a complete list; I'm sure there are more I don't know about!
Hello fellow Beermoney earners! For the past few months I've been searching for ways to earn money passively (or as passively as possible). This guide will not cover any kind of Bitcoin/Dogecoin/etc. Mining, faucets, etc. Thus far, I would say I've been pretty successful. I'm not rich and I'm not making hundreds, but the methods I'll outline below are pretty much little/no effort beyond getting set up. I'll provide payment proofs to any of the methods below if you ask for them, if available. I will mention but not elaborate on the common/already well known methods, as we already get enough of that and I won't contribute to the spam. The following sites are in no particular order. I'll also happily answer any questions, but I ask that you at least explore the site and try to find things before asking me what to do.
NOTE: I know I'm going to get at least one person saying "Not worth it, power bills, electricity, global warming, illuminati, etc. etc. etc.". I'd like to stop that person right here and tell them that yes, in theory, this could cost you more in power than it could make you. If you don't pay for your power, then it's irrelevant. If you DO pay for your power, then you can use these methods only when your computer would normally be on and the problem pretty much goes away. If your computer is always on anyways, only the CPU-renting methods will likely have any impact on your power bills (if any). I would rather not debate this. If you feel that it's not worth it, you're welcome to not try any of these.
INTERNATIONAL NOTE: I believe that all of these except for Qmee, Perk TV and Bing Rewards, are international, at least partially. I could be wrong, and if anybody knows I'm wrong please let me know and I will make edits as necessary.
eBesucher ---- Non-ref is a passive surfbar site, and one I've been using the longest. Simply open a surfbar tab and let it go. eBesucher also created a small program called the "Restarter" that will monitor your surfbar tab in whatever browser you choose and restart the browser if the surfbar stops (due to frambreakers, shitty site scripts, etc.). Other than that, it requires no input. Run this in whatever browser you don't use; it works in Firefox, Chrome, IE, and Safari. If you use Firefox, it also comes with an extension that will monitor your surfbar and give you double points when you hit a framebreaker site, but I've found it doesn't work as well as the Restarter at fixing the surfbar when you run over faulty scripts. eBesucher requires no attention checks and is 100% automated. You can also get a few cents for reading mails sent to your in-site Inbox (or actual email inbox if you choose). Minimum payout is 2 Euro, PayPal (and some others) accepted. Payout is manual.
4PTP ---- Non-ref is a Pay-to-Promote site, one of the only ones I've found that pays anything worthwhile. Simply send traffic to your link (however you'd like to do that, such as HitLeap (which I will mention below)) and you'll rack up points which convert to cash every 6 hours. Note that this site DOES accept traffic from traffic exchanges, etc., but be aware that your promote link is a very "intense" site; there's a lot of frames of activity and some traffic exchanges may not like that. Beyond Hitleap, it might take a few tries to find one that works. Minimum payout is $2, to PayPal and others. Payout is manual. NOTE: It is normal for a large amount of your traffic to not be counted. I don't know why this is, but it might be a side effect of traffic exchanges (or things like AdBlock, no java, etc.). Also NOTE: 4PTP might be rejected by Hitleap. If this happens, just wait a little while and try again. I had it rejected after working fine for almost a month, and I just resubmitted it a day later and it was fine.
Ysear.ch ---- Non-ref EDIT: They WILL eventually ban you if you don't use HitLeap premium, so if you don't have it, I wouldn't recommend this anymore. is a link monetizer (like Adf.ly). Shorten links, have people click those links, get money. Normally that would be a very slow process, but Ysear.ch works with Hitleap (again, I'll explain below). I want to note that while I and some others have been paid, you might end up banned, especially if you don't have a Premium Hitleap account so you can use randomized or directed traffic. Be aware of this. When using Ysear.ch for Hitleap, make sure your shortened ads are "Framed Banner", not "Interstitial" (under More Options, when shrinking your link). Payouts are automatic on the 6th of each month. I think the minimum is $2.50.
Hitleap ---- Non-ref is a pretty well-known traffic exchange site, so I won't go too much into it (PM me if you need more info, though). Submit your link(s) from sites like 4PTP and Ysear.ch and run the Hitleap Viewer as often as possible to rack up minutes, which will automatically be spent on directing traffic to your links. I personally use 15 seconds for all of my links, but I imagine you could get away with 11 or 12; adding a few seconds helps make sure the site loads. Upgrading to Premium can be worth it, and lets you add more links and spoof the traffic source. Your choice.
LinkCollider is another traffic exchange site. (Note: I didn't include a referral link because I don't think it matters unless someone buys something.) This one is a bit different from Hitleap, but works in pretty much the same way. Submit your links (up to 3), and then do activities such as autosurf, manual surf, "Like" FB pages, Retweet things, etc. to build up coins which are automatically spent on having your sites viewed, Liked, Shared, etc.. I personally turn off all social media for my links, since I'm pretty sure it will be wasted compared to just getting raw views to your website. The interface might be a little confusing at first, but it only takes a little exploring to get the hang of it.
Qmee ---- Non-ref is very well known in this subreddit so I'll be very brief for the couple of people who might not know- Download extension, click ads that show up when you search on Google, Amazon, eBay, and Bing, and cashout to Paypal. No minimum amount. I have found that your earnings decrease over time if you click the ads and do not interact with them, and/or click a lot of ads for the same search. Try not to abuse the system by obviously searching for things you have no interest in, as I think the system is actually kind of smart and might pick up on that. I could be wrong though. This method is not 100% passive but requires very little effort.
Slicify ---- Non-ref is a CPU rental service. Download their control panel (and Oracle VMBox, which comes with it) and your computer will automatically have its processing rented out. Save yourself the time and check that your computer can operate virtual machines (Slicify can help you determine this). You get paid for every hour your computer is being rented, from .01/hr and up. When your computer is being rented, it will likely take up a lot of memory and processing (though you can customize how much of your system's resources you're renting out) so if you want to do stuff like play games, turn this off while you're doing it. You can also set up a schedule so it will only run when you wouldn't be using your computer anyways. Minimum payout is $5, manually to PayPal. If you have access to multiple computers (I strongly recommend desktop only unless your laptop has excellent cooling/ventilation), you can run this on multiple machines.
GomezPeerZone ---- Non-ref is another CPU renting application. You can run it concurrently with Slicify, though if both are going at once it will probably eat a lot of resources. A major note here is that you are not earning with GomezPeer from day 1. You have to be approved, and this takes an undetermined amount of time, during which you need to run the software and you lose your earnings each month. Once you do get approved, you'll earn automatically and get any earnings you made in the month you were approved. I believe payouts are automatic, to PayPal. You can also run this on multiple machines at once.
MQL5 Cloud Strategy Testing Agent (no referrals as far as I know) is a minor CPU "renting" service. Download their program, sign up with MQL5, and then open up some testing agents (the download site will provide instructions). You won't make much with this, maybe up to 60 cents a month, but it is 100% passive, non-invasive, and takes up little/no resources. Payout is to Paypal, no minimum but it does take a small commission. You can run this on multiple machines.
ScreenwiseTrends Panel (no referrals) is similar to Synapster in that it tracks your browser usage; this one is run by Google who is already monitoring everything you do and every piss you take anyways. You get $1 per week your computer is active (plus $.50 for a tablet and $.50 for a smartphone, if applicable) with the Chrome extension. Payout is at $25, so this is a slow earner. Like above, if you're not cool with being monitored like this, feel free to skip over it.
Perk TV ---- Non-ref is a video-watching app similar to Swagbucks TV available on iOS and Android; Perk also has other apps you can use for rewards. This has gotten the rounds on the subreddit recently, so I'll be brief: Watch app trailers and earn points. PerkTV automatically loops the videos endlessly, no attention checks needed. Minimum payout is a $2 Amazon giftcard at 2500 points. There's a lot of other gift cards at the $5 level if you so choose. You can get $5 to PayPal for 9000 points but it is really not worth it. At all.
Some would consider Apptrailers (iOS, Android) to be passive, if you don't mind pressing "OK" and "Play" every 30-45 seconds for half a cent each. I did do this for a while, like when watching Netflix, but I prefer the video apps like Perk TV and SBTV now. You're welcome to do this.
Peko (iOS) is also passive, kinda-sorta. It's a weird little app that pays you to play a silly little game with people. You can idly spam the "Peko me!" emote in the Scramble Match room until you get "Peko'd", play the games, and then cash out at the minimum of $10. I did this a lot; cashed out about 6 times, and then got absolutely sick of it and stopped. I might pick it up again, but it's what I would consider passive in theory.
Bing Rewards I also do Bing Rewards using a bot. If you don't know about Bing Rewards, check out the "Most Commonly Posted Beermoney Sites" sticky and sign up from there. It's not 100% passive, but it's close. The bot I use and recommend is "The BingR", made by a reddit user whose name escapes me, but it's an excellent bot that acts very human-like and even automates the daily bonus activities and mobile searches.
Swagbucks I also also use the SBTV app and do the auto-running Swagbucks Activities on a second computer or browser (with Chrome, you can run the activity and then minimize out of the browser and it will still run; this doesn't seem to work with Firefox). If you don't know about Swagbucks, also check out the Sticky. This is also not 100% passive, but it pays pretty well. The auto-run activities have a white circle with a blue arrow and play button in the lower left-hand corner of the picture. These will run on their own and require no input beyond clicking. If you can't get them to run while minimized, you'll need to keep the window open with your mouse in the active part of the screen.
I'm always looking for new passive income streams; the less work, the better! If you're going to recommend a surfbar, it can't require any attention checks and preferably it should run in-browser and not on top of windows like some require.
submitted by darkwulfv to beermoney [link] [comments]

An (Updated!) Guide to Passive Beermoney

Greetings /beermoney! A few months ago I created this guide as a way to show some passive ways to earn beermoney. My old guide is a little antiquated, so here's an updated version with new methods to earn! (For those of you who might have already read this guide, most of the old stuff is copy-pasted to save lots of time) I'm still always looking for new passive ways to earn, so if you know of any please let me know!
If you're looking for passive ways to earn on your mobile Android device, I cover them here: An Updated Guide to Android Beermoney
This guide will not cover any kind of Bitcoin/Dogecoin/etc. Mining, faucets, etc. I'll provide payment proofs to any of the methods below if you ask for them, if available. The following sites are in no particular order. I'll also happily answer any questions, but I ask that you at least explore the site/app and try to find things before asking me what to do.
NOTE: I know I'm going to get at least one person saying "Not worth it, power bills, electricity, global warming, illuminati, etc. etc. etc.". I'd like to stop that person right here and tell them that yes, in theory, this could cost you more in power than it could make you. If you don't pay for your power, then it's irrelevant. If you DO pay for your power, then you can use these methods only when your computer would normally be on and the problem pretty much goes away. If your computer is always on anyways, only the CPU-renting methods will likely have any impact on your power bills (if any). I would rather not debate this. If you feel that it's not worth it, you're welcome to not try any of these.
INTERNATIONAL NOTE: The following are not international: Qmee, Bing Rewards, MXWRK
eBesucher ---- Non-ref ---- 2.10euros per month, give or take is a passive surfbar site, and one I've been using the longest. Simply open a surfbar tab and let it go. eBesucher also created a small program called the "Restarter" that will monitor your surfbar tab in whatever browser you choose and restart the browser if the surfbar stops (due to frambreakers, shitty site scripts, etc.). Other than that, it requires no input. Run this in whatever browser you don't use; it works in Firefox, Chrome, IE, and Safari. If you use Firefox, it also comes with an extension that will monitor your surfbar and give you double points when you hit a framebreaker site, but I've found it doesn't work as well as the Restarter at fixing the surfbar when you run over faulty scripts. eBesucher requires no attention checks and is 100% automated. You can also get a few cents for reading mails sent to your in-site Inbox (or actual email inbox if you choose). Minimum payout is 2 Euro, PayPal (and some others) accepted. Payout is manual.
4PTP ---- Non-ref ---- $2-5 per month* is a Pay-to-Promote site, one of the only ones I've found that pays anything worthwhile. Simply send traffic to your link (however you'd like to do that, such as HitLeap (which I will mention below)) and you'll rack up points which convert to cash every 6 hours. Note that this site DOES accept traffic from traffic exchanges, etc., but be aware that your promote link is a very "intense" site; there's a lot of frames of activity and some traffic exchanges may not like that. Beyond Hitleap, it might take a few tries to find one that works. Minimum payout is $2, to PayPal and others. Payout is manual. NOTE: It is normal for a large amount of your traffic to not be counted. I don't know why this is, but it might be a side effect of traffic exchanges (or things like AdBlock, no java, etc.). Also NOTE: 4PTP might be rejected by Hitleap. If this happens, just wait a little while and try again. I had it rejected after working fine for almost a month, and I just resubmitted it a day later and it was fine.
Hitleap ---- Non-ref is a pretty well-known traffic exchange site, so I won't go too much into it (PM me if you need more info, though). Submit your link(s) from sites like 4PTP and Ysear.ch and run the Hitleap Viewer as often as possible to rack up minutes, which will automatically be spent on directing traffic to your links. I personally use 15 seconds for all of my links, but I imagine you could get away with 11 or 12; adding a few seconds helps make sure the site loads. Upgrading to Premium can be worth it, and lets you add more links and spoof the traffic source. Your choice.
Qmee ---- Non-ref ---- Varies too much to give a good estimate is very well known in this subreddit so I'll be very brief for the couple of people who might not know- Download extension, click ads that show up when you search on Google, Amazon, eBay, and Bing, and cashout to Paypal. No minimum amount. I have found that your earnings decrease over time if you click the ads and do not interact with them, and/or click a lot of ads for the same search. Try not to abuse the system by obviously searching for things you have no interest in, as I think the system is actually kind of smart and might pick up on that. I could be wrong though. This method is not 100% passive but requires very little effort.
GomezPeerZone ---- Non-ref ---- $6.30 per month, give or take is another CPU renting application. You can run it concurrently with Slicify, though if both are going at once it will probably eat a lot of resources. A major note here is that you are not earning with GomezPeer from day 1. You have to be approved, and this takes an undetermined amount of time, during which you need to run the software and you lose your earnings each month. Once you do get approved, you'll earn automatically and get any earnings you made in the month you were approved. I believe payouts are automatic, to PayPal. You can also run this on multiple machines at once.
MXWRK ---- Non-ref ---- $.10-20 per day used to be a task-crowdsourcing site like mTurk, but recently revamped into a passive earner with optional tasks for extra cash. You download their toolbar (Firefox only) and let it run. The longer it runs, the more you get. It will alert you of new tasks that pay $.05-$.10 each and are pretty quick to do. If you do plan to use this and Firefox is your main browser, look up a guide for setting up secondary profiles and run the MXWRK toolbar in that profile in a separate instance of Firefox; you can't have Adblock running with MXWRK. They pay out to PayPal every day.
MQL5 Cloud Strategy Testing Agent ---- Like $.60 per month, lol (no referrals as far as I know) is a minor CPU "renting" service. Download their program, sign up with MQL5, and then open up some testing agents (the download site will provide instructions). You won't make much with this, maybe up to 60 cents a month, but it is 100% passive, non-invasive, and takes up little/no resources. Payout is to Paypal, no minimum but it does take a small commission. You can run this on multiple machines.
ScreenwiseTrends Panel ---- $6.00 per month (1 computer 1 phone) (no referrals) tracks your browser usage; this one is run by Google who is already monitoring everything you do and every piss you take anyways. You get $1 per week your computer is active (plus $.50 for a tablet and $.50 for a smartphone, if applicable) with the Chrome extension. Payout is at $25, so this is a slow earner. If you're not cool with being monitored like this, feel free to skip over it. Once you order your reward, it will take 6 weeks to reach you, so don't be alarmed.
Bing Rewards ($25-40 in AGC) I also do Bing Rewards using a bot. If you don't know about Bing Rewards, check out the "Most Commonly Posted Beermoney Sites" sticky and sign up from there. It's not 100% passive, but it's close. The bot I use and recommend is "The BingR", made by a reddit user whose name escapes me, but it's an excellent bot that acts very human-like and even automates the daily bonus activities and mobile searches.
Swagbucks ($30+ in AGC) can be 90%+ passive, and you can still earn plenty per day! I wrote a (similarly long) guide, which you can view right here, at this shameless plug. If you find that guide useful and you aren't already a member of Swagbucks, I would appreciate if you used my referral (you'll have to PM me), but otherwise use the one in the Sticky. Please note that this guide is out of date and I don't plan on updating it right now.
I'm always looking for new passive income streams; the less work, the better! If you're going to recommend a surfbar, it can't require any attention checks and preferably it should run in-browser and not on top of windows like some require.
submitted by darkwulfv to beermoney [link] [comments]

Format test, ignore

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
.
Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
.
See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
.
May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
.
pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
.
This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to heyfuckyou [link] [comments]

I made a simple blockchain project and now wrote this guide for entrepreneurs interested in smart contracts

The following is the exact copy of my medium article. No need to go there if you prefer reddit. And please ignore my startup mentioned here. I spent a whole month writing this huge guide - it's far beyond a mere promotion. This post is about Ethereum blockchain. I do love it.
As I'm an entrepreneur myself (with some humble programming skills) I think I managed to explain clearly the practical side of Ethereum smart contracts - what can be done and how. Think this sub is the best place for it. Hope you'll find this helpful.
Will do my best to answer all your questions (please mind the time difference - I'm in Russia).

An entrepreneur, programmer and user walk into a smart contract - The ultimate Ethereum blockchain stratup guide.

Lifehack - you don't need to understand blockchain to build a smart contract startup.

I made my smart contract project and still feel as a total noob reading discussions on blockchain. There is so much to learn for me. But, hey, my project works! Why bother? Though blockchain is cool and it's cool to understand the technology, there is no need to understand everything.
Take a look at smart contracts from an entrepreneurs point of view - focus on how you can benefit from it. What kinds of projects you can actually do? What business models are there? What an MVP would look like? What it takes to engage a user, find a programmer and build infrastructure?
This guide with examples and exercises will show you the practical side of smart contracts and help you estimate your idea or generate a new one. Use it as a starting point for your further investigation.

What you do need to know about blockchain and what you may just skip

Mining. The first thing to skip. From an entrepreneur's point of view mining is more like playing the stock market - buy equipment, analyze reward price charts and decide which crypto currency to invest your computing power to. But if you are dealing with smart contracts, you don't have to care about mining for the same reason you don't care about Internet providers when visiting a web-site.
Blocks, hashes, cryptography and all that math - we gonna ignore it too. The important practical outcome can be reduced to this mantra: "Everything that gets into blockchain remains there forever, anything can be verified, but nothing can be changed". In practice it means that data is stored permanently, transparently and securely.
Now let's turn to the terms you cannot do without and explain them as if it's year 2005 now.
Blockchain is like a BitTorrent network. A program on your computer downloads files and afterwards gives them away. But the program is called blockchain client rather than torrent client. And those files you download store transactions instead of videos and music. Sender, recipient, date-time and ammount - records are stored one after another (yes, they are stored in blocks, but who cares). Everybody who runs blockchain client has his own copy of the whole blockchain database and keeps all transactions that have ever been made. This database is huge. Ethereum blockchain is currently about 43 GB, Bitcoin is 125.78 GB. todo
Cryptocurrency is a list of money transfers. In blockchain world your balance is not just a single record, but the sum of all your receipts and expenditures (the entire transactions history). If a blockchain stores transactions which only contain money transfers (sender address, recipient address and amount being sent), we call this type of blockchain a cryptocurrency. Bitcoin - is a cryptocurrency. But any transaction is just a string in a file, thus it may contain any information. An address in turn may not belong to a human... which gives us much wider opportunities then just a crypto currency.
Smart contract is like a web site. A blockchain address may belong to a program. A program then is called a smart contract. It is called a contract just because the code is open. However it is simpler to compare it to a web site (or web service). For example, a classified advertisements service could be a smart contract. Its code would be stored at a particular address in the blockchain - just like a web site url. A transaction to this address would not contain money but an advertisement text. And the smart contract would publish this advertisement, i.e. saves to blockchain.
Ethereum is like the Internet Ethereum - is exactly the kind of blockchain in which transactions may contain not only money, but data. The blockchain database (those files one downloads) stores transactions between people, transactions involving smart contracts and contracts source codes. This makes Ethereum kinda new type of the Internet, which is stored locally by everyone involved.
And that's really enough for the theory. The rest you'll learn from what it all means in practice.

What is the difference between a smart contract and a conventional web site

What are the advantages (and disadvantages) of a smart contract driven service.

Openness and Encryption

A user doesn't have to trust you. "Everything that gets into blockchain remains there forever, anything can be verified, but nothing can be changed". The user sees exactly how your system works (smart contract code is open) and stays confident in the reliability of your database (database is transparent and unchangeable). Meaning there is no need to win users trust.
For example, you can turn a classified advertisements service into an open auction with charity donations. The process of selling would look as follows. A seller sets the initial price and posts a lot. After that anybody will be able to track bets, see a winner, see how much seller earned and how much was deducted to charity and to platform commission. Everybody is confident there was no cheating.
Where it benefits most. Gambling (Roulethvdice.io), prediction markets (Augur, Gnosis), voting, multilevel marketing (TheMillionEtherHomepage).

Payment processing "out of the box"

You don't have to deal with any payment processing services. Solidity language with which smart contracts are written incorporates all the necessary money (Ether cryptocurrency) operators. User balance is just another variable in your code. You can program any behavior to it - like triggering an event on receiving a certain amount of money or making a multisignature payment and much more. That is why Ether and other cryptocurrencies are often referred to as programmable money.
Where it benefits most. Crowdfunding platforms (Weifund, Wings.ai), rent services Golem - rent unused CPU/GPU cycles.

Decentralization

You don't have to worry about DoS attacks and scalability. Every blockchain user has it's own smart contract copy locally on his computer, thus it will withstand any load, free of charge.
Where it benefits most. Smart contracts gave rise to a totally new kind of companies - decentralized organizations (DAOs). DAO is a separate phenomenon worth studying. In the meantime, just ask yourself: "Why do we need an intermediary like Uber, if it is possible to connect a driver and a passenger through a smart contract directly?". What prospects does it opens? Have a look at this startups: Arcade city and Lazooz.
Lifehack: When googling for A DAO, ignore the hassle around THE DAO). The only reason THE DAO failed was braking some basic smart contract safety rules (we'll discuss them further).

Transaction delay and commission

A user have to pay for every transaction and have to wait a bit too. The average transaction is mined (read included) into Ethereum blockchain in 14-15 seconds. There is a high chance of reducing this delay down to 4 seconds in the near future. But even then we are all got used to a better responsiveness. Moreover a simple money transfer (two addresses involved, no contracts, minimal amount of data) would cost about 0.000861 ETH ($0.02 in March 2017). These "drawbacks" are tiny, but enough to build a heavy threshold for certain types of projects.
Where it doesn't benefit. A chat for example. Each message chips a couple of weis (Ether denomination) off your balance and requires half a minute to reach the other end. This is probably a bad idea for a startup unless you are dealing with some official correspondence, which requires legal force and does not require privacy.
With smart contracts you can choose almost any web service and make it blockchain. Plus you are free to create completely new blockchain-only types of projects. See what has already been done, mix it up with Internet of things, artificial intelligence, virtual worlds or fintech, and you'd most probably get a unicorn.
Note: You can make a smart contract with Bitcoin too, but it's like doing 3D in MS Excel. Kinda possible, but why?

What business models are there

You are free to use any business model. But first have a look at what have already become a new standard in Ethereum - tokens.
In conventional terms tokens business model is like crowdfunding and IPO combined. The "crowd" buys shares of your company instead of products. And in the future the shares (tokens) may be sold or exchanged for your services.
This became possible because Solidity (Ethereum smart contract language) allows issuing your own cryptocurrency.
For example. You came up with a classified advertisement platform idea. You want it to have its own internal currency (tokens) called Advertisement (ADV). You want to charge 1 ADV for placing an advertisement, 2 ADVs for pinning it to the top and 0.2 ADVs for updating. You write a smart contract. All that it is capable of at this point is receiving money (ETH) and keeping users balances.
Now you announce your platform in a way that crowdfunding projects usually do and offer to buy ADVs at low cost 1 ADV = 1 ETH. Later when your platform is live you'll set the ADV price to 10 ETH. After that those who invested in the very beginning will be able to sell their ADVs gaining income or place their ads 10 times cheaper than the current price. But for now you've earned your ETH to spend on development.
Tokens are attractive enough on their own to start experimenting with smart contracts.

What it takes to engage a user

Ok. You published your first smart contract. But what it takes to engage a user with no blockchain experience to use it? And how can we lower the threshold?
We can break user experience into two parts: interacting with blockchain (what a user has to do anyway) and interacting with your smart contract (ways we can make a user's life easier).

Interacting with blockchain

What a user has to do anyway.
Get an address (a wallet). An address and a key to it is like username and password. There is no way to interact with blockchain without it. The easiest way to get it is to use generator at MyEtherWallet.com. It takes less than one minute and as a result, user receives an address and a key. The address is a 42 character sting and the key is a small file. The key file is used to sign transactions and has to be saved as securely as possible - there is no way to restore it. A user can use the same address to interact with any smart contract.
IMG: Generate a wallet at MyEtherWallet.com
Get some ether (ETH). Any transaction requires commission (0,001 to 0,01 ETH on average). A user has to fuel up his address with a sufficient sum to interact with your contract. Buying ether is possible through major exchanges. These exchanges require 1-3 day for identity approval and are available in a limited list of countries. Users from other countries and those not eager to wait (especially when buying Ether worth a couple of bucks) may use almost instant alternatives.
Look and feel exercise: generate a wallet and send some Ether to it.
Access a blockchain client. Any interaction with blockchain and with any smart contract accordingly is done through a blockchain-client.
As of March 2017 downloading Ethereum database to an HDD disk (70% are still using HDDs) requires 2-3 days and 43 GB of spare space. It makes computer unresponsive enough to start throwing things at it. Keeping blockchain in sync too requires about the same amount of resources as watching a movie online does.
Not to confuse the pros. For the sake of simplicity we call EthereumWallet, Mist browser, geth and parity the blockchain client. We are entrepreneurs here, it is only a programmer who should really know the difference.
There is also a so called light client. It doesn't require downloading the database. But it still requires installation and getting hands dirty with manuals. Our target audience is not willing to do it either.
So let's be realistic our target audience will hardly install any blockchain client on their computers. Let's see how we can help.
A necessary and sufficient minimum for a user to start interacting with any smart contract is an address (key file) and a tiny amount of ether on it.

Interacting with your smart contract

We got to simplify user experience with a graphical user interface (GUI). In Ethereum GUIs do not belong to smart contracts and are stored off the blockchain. There are several ways to "attach" GUI to a smart contract. Here are they from the least to the most user-friendly.

Smart contract with no GUI

Users can interact with smart contracts directly, with no GUI at all.
Blockchain client can identify smart contract functions and let user work with it. The client provides auto-generated GUI so a contract looks and feels like a sign-in form of a website. This is a straightforward way of writing to and reading from contract.
IMG: Access contract function through Ethereum Wallet
But we agreed we won't force user to deal with blockchain clients. To set user free from it we can try to offer MyEtherWallet.com (an online client). Contract interaction will look just the same, but there is no need to download or learn anything.
IMG: Access the same function through MyEtherWallet.com
The contract without GUI has to be very well documented. It is also a good idea to make a landing page to display the current state of the contract.
For example, TheMillionEtherHomepage.com displays the state of the underlying contract and offers users to work with it directly giving all necessary instructions. The same setup would likely be a minimum for a classified advertisements smart contract. So the user with no blockchain background would be able to grasp the idea of the service.
Look and feel exercise: Try following sign in instructions for TheMillionEtherHomepage.com (it's free) and see what it is like to use MyEtherWallet.com.
A Smart contract without GUI will do as a minimum viable product

Decentralized application (DApp) - GUI in a browser

In the above example the website doesn't allow writing to the contract being just a representation of its state (it only reads from the contract). To let user interact with your contract (read and write) through your own GUI you gonna need a DApp. DApp is a GUI for your contract in a browser.
A browser can simultaneously connect to the Internet and to a blockchain client. This allows a smart contract to look (and work) just like a conventional web-site. A user will follow a link like http://myClassyAdvertisements.com and see your website in the full beauty of HTML, CSS and JavaScript, then will be prompted to fill ad text and click "publish". The only difference the user will notice is a pop-up offering to select a keyfile on the disk instead of asking for a username-password.
The GUI is taken from the Internet, but transactions are sent to a local blockchain client.
Browser can connect either to full or light blockchain client. We discarded them both. There is a browser with "included" client - the Mist browser. But it is too complex too. The easiest solution is the Google Chrome plugin Metamask which brings all blockchain benefits right into the browser. This is what we want our user to install.
Look and feel exercise: Go to tokens exchange platform Maker Market, then install Metamask Chrome plugin and try Maker Market again. See how metamask brings blockchain functionality to the website.
DApp and Metamask browser plugin make your smart contract look and feel just like a web-site

Mobile application

We can make any GUI for mobile or desktop application and bring any feature to it. But in order to send transactions it has to communicate with a blockchain client too.
The ways to do it without any locally installed client are: embedding a light client right into your application or communicating with a remote blockchain client (see infrastructure section further).
Look and feel exercise: Try installing Jaxx wallet or Free Wallet on your phone.
To engage a user with no blockchain background means to make him get an address, buy a bit of Ether and install your mobile app or Metamask browser plugin.

What it takes to build an infrastructure

Let's turn to even more practical (and technical) parts. First what will you have to buy. From the cheapest to the most expensive setup.

Smart contract with no GUI

Regardless of the way you've implemented the GUI, you need to publish your contract first. Publication of a contract is a transaction too. Commission for it is negligible. If you managed to pay 1 ETH for commission, then your project is larger than the majority of existing ones.
Project documentation may be published for free at readthedocs.com. Or upload instruction videos to youtube.
If you want to display the status of the contract on a web-site the way TheMillionEtherHomepage.com does, you have to develop a back-end that will "listen" to the contract through a blockchain-client. Thus you need a hosting to run your website, blockchain client and your blockchain client "listener".
Before buying a hosting check out Etherscan.io and Infura APIs. These are "remote" blockchain clients which will probably let you build your landing page with pure Javascript and no back-end.

DApp

DApp is just a web page (HTML, CSS, JAvaScript). A simple hosting with no database and frameworks support will probably be enough for a start. Remember your user has to interact through his own client (a local one or Metamask). So introduce a version for those with no access to blockchain (see a paragraph up - make a web-page representing your smart contract status).

Mobile App

For a mobile app you'd probably need a server with a running blockchain client to let your app communicate with the blockhain through it. Or you can embed light client right into your app. Or use Etherscan.io and Infura API. Depends on your features. A more detailed (and more technical) guide is here - Mobile: Introduction

Which developer skills are required

What kind of developers skills you want to search?
First - responsibility, second - patience and third - JavaScript front-end skills. Safety first, because failure price is very high.

Smart contract with no GUI

Ethereum has its own language for smart contracts which is called Solidity.
The language looks very much like JavaScript and simple to learn. But one has to be really really really careful writing smart contracts.
Any contact is open source. Anyone can copy it and quietly experiment with attack options before an actual attack. With no thought out bug fixing strategies, neither address nor contract code can be changed after its publication. If there is a vulnerability and no escape paths, you'll helplessly observe your balance approaching zero. So it was with the ill-fated DAO (remember the life hack - The DAO is just an example of how one shouldn't write smart contracts).
Responsibility. Ethereum community recommends writing smart contract as if it were a firmware for electronics or a financial service (but NOT a web-site). For anyone eager to write smart contacts this official document on safety is a must.

DApp

DApp is HTML, CSS and JavaScript. JavaScript library web3.js provides interaction with blockchain client. A front-end developer will do the job.
Patience You need a patient and curious developer. This is the person to dive deepest into blockchain technology, make raw developer tools work and read through tons of documentation.
Regardless of whether your contract has a GUI or not, you gonna need a JavaScript developer. As it is strongly recommended (no, it is actually a must) to cover close to 100% of smart contract functionality with tests, which are written in JavaScript. Detailed developer guide is here here.

Mobile apps and back-ends

Mobile and desktop applications can be written in any language. Recommendations are the same as for the DApp. To connect your app to a blockchain client (full, light or remote) there are ready-made libraries available. For example, python. To embed a light client, check out geth.

Conclusion

Lifehack: Jump off the cliff and build wings on the way down © Ray Douglas Bradbury.
There are only 368 dapps listed at the official Ethereum dapps list and only one third of them is live. I believe this indicates the lack of understanding, not possibilities. It makes Ethereum a great chance to build a future game changer.
You may get some insights learning technology deeper. It is useful to know many of the underlying concepts of Ethereum and blockchain technology in general. But for the smart contracts and for the start this guide is a enough.
As you've seen there is not much complexity. If you are already dealing with websites and JavaScript all you have to do is pump up your team's responsibility. And if you already have an idea, just give a test flight. And see how high you can go.
Thank you for reading.
submitted by takeshi_reg to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

What entity manages .com, .net, .gov, .us, .cn domains?

For the longest time I still have not a clue how this works. I am not sure if this is the right subreddit or something like networking
This is all I understand so far about the web (or internet?), computers, and electronics in general (its super long just skip to bold part if you need to)
INTERNET:
Okay, but who manages the .info, .com, .net, .cn, .rs, and .gov top level domains?
There's obviously some domains that are specific to countries, and are most likely managed by that countries' government entity. E.G (.us for usa? .ws for russia, .cn for china) but aren't nearly as popular as the .net and .com domains.
.Org and .gov are US? government regulated top level domains to my knowledge, where .org is mostly nonprofit. U.S.A uses .gov domains for its government organizations
So I understand that some countries government manages that domain. But what about public top level domains, like .com, .info, .net, .ca?
Who manages the database for those? Who gives authority to godaddy for those domains for rent? Who mediates copyright conflicts for those domains? (E.G. say my name is Mike Cro Soft, and I wanted to rent a domain called mikecrosoft, but get DMCA'd / copyrighted by microsoft.com)
Like, what are the big organizations mediating internet protocols and legislation on a global scale?
Who or what has access to the biggest picture of the web, and its workings and backend?
sorry for the long wall of text, I've been missing some vital information on how the web? (or is it internet?) works
disclaimer: I don't take CS classes and did not major in computer science. So I might be really off in what i understand about the internet as a whole. Most of this is just what I learned from browsing reddit and youtube
Apologies in advance if i butchered a bunch of terms and how things work. I just wrote things as they randomly came to me
submitted by Rubick555 to AskComputerScience [link] [comments]

Blockchain summit report: Day 1 - "Enterprise cloud"

previous days
`
Event details
Today was day 1 of the 2 day "International Blockchain summit" presentations. On every seat was a little bag that had 3 books about the Blockchain! Unfortunately they were all in Chinese.
http://imgur.com/jmkRYVj http://imgur.com/g66KeRD
`
Presentations summary
Whereas DEVCON2 was all about development, and leveraging the network effects of leveraging other projects in the ecosystem, the presentations today were VERY high level talks.
There was a massive stark difference between "the old guard" in the Fintech space, and the disruptors that are shaking things up.
Take a look at the BOC (Bank of China) and ChinaLedger presentations. They talk about how Distributed computing is dangerous. ChinaLedger go on to say that they need the power to be able to go in and halt transactions, modify smart contracts on the fly, liquidate accounts when they need. While also saying that they will make sure they will do everything to help privacy and use encryption… which only the Government can unlock ("Golden keys"?). It was the most centralised "Blockchain" I have ever heard of.
On the flip side I was inspired by the forward thinking of the Consensys presentation, and their long term vision for where to drive the Ethereum platform. They are helping to create open tools and platforms that will be leveragable by a multitude of projects (as demonstrated with Ujo and BHP project "Rai stones").
http://imgur.com/AXHw1Df
After the Consensys presentation, my 2nd favourite presentation was by Wanxiang labs "10 years to build a city", talking about how they plan on taking some land and creating from scratch a smart city powered by the blockchain and electric vehicles. While the other old guard are squabbling about how it is going to impact their "business as usual" profits, there were the new projects out there envisioning and disrupting.
The BHP presentation was also pretty cool, a great implemenation of using Blockchain to improve a business process.
`
Presentations
New Finance: Technical & Legal rules - BoC He is from bank of China. Entire presentation was him being scared and trying to justify why current Blockchain tech is an unregulated wasteland, and why there needs to be regulation from banks and government.
For Fintech they think Blockchain will not be successful without proper regulations Blockchain finance - it is distributed. Storing all of the transactions will take a lot of storage space. What to do once the transaction rates exceed what can be processed. Thinks that public distributed transactions will not be more than a toy like with Bitcoin. For real FinTech they need something different for a high frequency. Thinks that decentralisation should not be the core feature of Blockchains (due to transaction limit). Thinks it should be decentralised, not distributed.
Should be done with private consortiums. Needs legal rules and technical rules. They think that self rulemaking currencies (Bitcoin) can not be regulated. So need to stop them, to prevent bad things like money laundering. This is showing the loopholes brought about by Bitcoin. So when using digital currencies, they need certifications and tracking.
"We need more regulations and rules to facilitate the healthy development of this space. Only with support of regulations can new technology take off".
Me: I totally disagree… (if not already apparent)
Blockchain futures & realities - CSDC
China Securities Depository and clearinghouse
He was much more open minded and forward looking. Is a pep talk for "things are going to change", how are we going to use these new things. He said that he recorded it into English that should be able to be downloaded, would be worth watching if you are into this space.
Summary: Genie is out of the bottle, we need to embrace this and think how we are going to put the requirements of securities ("real name transactions") in a decentralised way. And the registration and tracking of assets to real names.
People have ideals because they are not happy with reality. Due to this dissatisfaction, people are passionate about trying to make that dream a reality. Need to play by the rules, or the market will be chaos. So now we have facilities law, regulations, etc. This forms the framework of China economic. This is very different from Blockchain. This is at odds to the distributed systems. Seems like we are dissatisfied with this, so trying to reconcile these differences.
All securities transactions need to follow "real name" transactions, but want to do this in a decentralised manner. Market cap is 54 trillion (of something in China). GDP is over 70 million
They are researching Blockchain, but not just in the lab. Need to find potential applications and use cases for it. If we want to implement Blockchain technologies, we need to see what the hurdles will be, so we can get closer to the ideal. As BoC speaker said, the number of transactions per seconds is HUGE. Daily may reach 10s of millions at its peak. How are we going to handle this with a theoretical framework. Need to start from the reality of China. And the reality is it is a giant country with a huge population, which depends on the capital market. If you just implement within a lab it is okay. But if it is going to be put into the industry, then we need to work with the government. We can't just get rid of the government, it is impossible (REVOLUTION!!). So need to focus on key senarios to tackle, as you can't just apply Blockchain everywhere simultaneously. Or all your efforts will fruitless. How to complement it initially, not replace it.
Ten years efforts to build a city (Wanxiang Labs)
Me: I reallly liked this presentation. I've been keeping notes for months around building this type of innovative city in Australia. I plan on rewatching this one again later.
Going to build a city in 10 years. An energy gathering city in HangZhou 10KM2. Their US company is starting to build new energy vehicle. 900m RMB? 90k people. Deploy the city into the cloud. Intelligent life, traffic & services. Everything will be connected. IoT, Internet, smart living, smart transport. Once this is successful, they plan on launching it across the world. Will publish their learnings. Launching incubators and accelerators. Their own cloud Blockchain as a Service. Many scenarios in this smart city that could utilise Blockchain. Distribution for Solar power. ID & Vehicle registration. Intelligent community services. Can promote a sharing economy throughout the community. Partnering with Microsoft, IBM, Consensys, Ethereum foundation, WeBank, AliCloud
Vitalik Buterin keynote
Talking of the progress China has made in Blockchain innovation in such a short period of time. He visited China 3 years ago and visited a number of Bitcoin companies and was impressed on the scale of what China had, much more than what was happening in USA. But all the focus was just on cryptocurrencies, not Blockchain technologies, Just mining. 2nd time, he saw some kind of experimentation happening with interesting things (like coloured coins?) 3rd time saw more interest in Blockchains. 4th? time, he did a hackathon with Wanxiang labs (event sponsor), and there were ~30 projects. The growth since then has been rapidly growing. The scale of projects we couldn't have imagined 3 years ago. Was just theoretical, now a lot of ideas are almost reality. e.g. Self-sovereign identity, instant settlement.
Hyperledger
https://www.hyperledger.org/ Goals. Build an opensource dev focused community of communities to build a hyperledger based solution. Create a family of "etnerprise grade" open source blockchain framework, platform & libraries.
Because it is an enterprise opensource project, they need to track contributions, patent details, etc. Is part of the Linux Foundation, which has 16 years of providing governance stucture support for major open source projects. 80 project partners. IBM, Intel, Accenture, JP Morgan, Airbus, ANZ bank, Cisco, etc. 20 of the 80 project partners, are based in China. Apache license v2.
A world or many chains. There will not be only one blockchain. There will be many public chians and millions of private chains. Each may use different consensus mechanisms.
Major projects are: Fabric: Developed by IBM. PBFT, moving to Raft and other pluggable consensus mechanisms. Written in Go. Sawtooth Lake: Proof of Elapsed Time. Runs on secure enclaves. Written in Python. Hyperledger explorer: GUI for navigating Fabric & swatooth lake. Fabric-py SDK. (Java proposed later).
Future: Smart contract engines. Portable identities. Will never see a "HyperCoin". It is about making Hyperledger a standard, and a governance group.
IBM keynote - IBM Blockchain & Hyperledger
Today if you want to do something in your business on Blockchain it is difficult. Hard to scale, issues with privacy. No Enterprise support. Need tools to write tests for smart contracts. Need good solution patterns. Difficult to scale up, especially around transaction rates.
Built Fabric to support "serious business" Permissioned blockchains can't scale. Every node shouldn't execute every transaction. The 2 peers that are interacting are the only ones that should execute. IBM has implemented this internally to resolve invoice disputes with their suppliers.
IBM
All the slides were in Chinese. Difficult to follow unfortuantely. The (original) Silk Road was important for trade. Blockchain may be just as important for trade in the future People are debating the need of distributed systems being an important thing of Blockchains, is it really necessiary? Blockchain should instead be focused on unblocking instead. IBM will provide an IBM certified docker container. IBM Blockchain. http://www-31.ibm.com/ibm/cn/blockchain/index.html Has a concept of a "shadow chain"?
Blockchain Platform @ Microsoft
At Devcon1 Microsoft announced Blockchain as a Service. Rolled out DevTest Labs to allow you to spin up public, private, permissioned, and consotrium blockchians quickly. Provisoin with 1 click. Mix & match from best available blockchain tech.
Bletchley: Open infrastructure, Enterprise capabilities. Microsoft is not building their own Blockchain.
Blockchain has some missing parts (identity, privacy, key management lifecycle, tools). Asked our partners what are the missing parts. A database in itself isn't an application.
(re)Announcing: Bletchley v1. 2 parts. Distributed infrastructure layer (Blockapps, R3, bitpay, parity, Eris). There isn't going to be 1 Blockchain to rule them all, so allow you to leverage any of them. Lots of customers were taking a long time trying to spin up private consortiums, and trying to secure them correctly. Used to take 3 weeks, now down to 8 questions and 5 minutes. Spins up a private Ethereum consortium. 4-100s of nodes.
Distributed middleware "fabric" layer. Tools that can work across many blockchain technologies. Cryptlets are a way of doing offchain processing. Receive market data based on an event (market price daily closing, CRM event). Need to have trusted execution of the logic, to attest that it was not tampered with. Secure IP protected algorithms. Scale an algorithm for max performance by running it off blockchain in a secure & attested way in the cloud. Oracles may be malicious, or they may be intercepted during transmission. Cryptlets run on a secure host with a secure communication channel in a trust envelope. Marketplace for publishing the cryptlets into a market for others to consume. Azure cloud is twice the size of Amazon & Google COMBINED.
Bletchley Cryptlet Fabric. Supports Ethereum, will support more Blockchains. It is middleware that will support many. Secure execution on demand. Standard way of publishing and accessing external resources.
BaaS roadmap. DevTest labs, will continue to onboard more. Bletchley v1. Kinakuta to help improve security. Bletchley SDK
Longer range implications of Ethereum & other decentralising technologies (Consensys) LOVED this presentation.
Simplest view: Next gen database. Blockchain based, maximal replication, Prevents rogue actors Force for universal disintermediation, will distrupt every industry. Previously it was mostly just Bitcoin. Future projects were "BitCoin 2.0", instead of "Blockchain 2.0". So Ethereum project built the most powerful and capable Blockchain platform, both public (permisionless) and private (permissioned) Deeply secure, non-repudiable shared source of truth. Dapp is a set of smart contracts. And a user interface to interact with it. Was important to get an initial version of Ethereum out into the hands of devs, to start thinking how to start building decentralised applications. Ethereum has a vision for scalability, which includes sharding and state channels. Privacy, state channels is one option. Zcash/zk-Snarks is another way.
Currently building out an ecosystem of decentralised applications. Building core components: Identity/persona (uPort, metamask). Wallet (uPort wallet). Registries (Regis, ENS). Token Factory. Do private enterprise Blockchains make sense? Yes, large entities can have a complex internal mix of business units, having a shared source of truth can help. If enterprises have their own private consortium Blockchains, will be a harder target to infiltrate and modify databases. Business processes emboided as state transition graphs.
If you plan on building your own tools or technology on top of Blockchain tech (public or private), build it on Ethereum so it can be reused in many different places by other entities running their private chains Developed "Balance" for real time compliance, accounting auditing and monitoring. Real time dashboard for companies & regulators. Organisations using certified software wil not be able to break or bend any financial accounting rules.
The Blockchain will last for years or decades giving a persistent database. Gives a chance to do persistent portable identity. uPort self-sovereign identity.
Blockapps Announcement
Is Ethereum for Enterprise. Partnered with Microsoft to announce Blockchain as a Service (BaaS). Over 1k projects have used it, over 300 customers. Being released in Azure China datacentre (mooncake), and other Chinese clouds : Alibaba cloud, tencent cloud, Wancloud. Initial China projects: Minsheng insurance, Wanxiang smart city, Qianhai smart city, Shanghai smart city. China is going to be the country leading the world in Blockchain projects.
The Rise of Blockchain Consortia: Uniting the Banking World
One of the largest banks in Spain. Banks are just a ledger (a very large ledger). Each bank has its own ledger. They don't trust each others. Which is why you need clearing houses and things like this. What if there was a shared ledger trusted by all banks. "It's not about the coin, its about the ledger.
`
New development of ChinaLedger: Forging a powerful tool for Chinese capital market in the FinTech era
Was literally the most centralised blockchain I have ever heard of. Please excuse me as I rant inline.
ChinaLedger is a consortium. 11 founders established it. Chinese financial institutions and Wanxiang labs. "we created our own Blockchain and tools". Will come up with their own custom software and implementation. Will create a whitepaper and create reference architecture. Partners will use the network to do transactions. Need facilities to be able to freeze or take over acounts, and get access to all data. A need to be able to halt or freeze a transaction or smart contract. A need to be able to halt or freeze a transaction or smart contract. and the facility to liquidate an account or smart conract or manually change the state of a smart contract We need to be able to stop the trading of certain stocks. Let regulators control things. Will be fully in control of the gas. Wants to support 100k/s and 1 ms latency.
Then ironically says tries to say they are going to put privacy into this. "Everything will be encrypted and private. Except that CCP & regulators who will have ability to read everything". I'm SURE that won't be abused…
http://imgur.com/Qt4qh3O You keep using that word... Blockchain, distributed ledger, privacy, encryption
Re-imagining Global Payments (For business)
Banks make a LOT of money from bank wires. So they have no incentive to come up with anything better. The person sending the money needs to give 26 pieces of information. Don't know when you'll get the money, what the rate will be. About $20 to send, $20 to receive, plus lose a few percentage through the conversion.
Their solution (for business payments). Register for an account, can use online. No fees. Transparent FX rate. Can track the payment. Uses Bitcoin in the middle. Before international calls used to call many $s per minute. Now with VoIP (Skype) you can do it for cents. Same thing will happen to international money transfers.
Enabling Global P2P Cash Transfers with Abra (For consumer)
https://www.goabra.com/ http://www.coindesk.com/abra-remittance-app-us-launch/
Nowadays you can send an IM to anyone else in the world instantly for free. Why can't you do the same thing with money? Can do it locally in some domestic markets, like paytm (india, WeChat pay (China), mpesa (Africa). But not for cross border transactions. iOS & Android. Real digital cash wallet. Send & receive globally. No FX risk. Add cash via bank or in person. As private as paper cash. Abra tellers earn $$ (as a percentage fee). The wallet is stored locally on the phone. So you "physically" control it. (need to back up your private key). Use an Abra teller (someone else using the app) to exchange buy/sell cash for digital cash. Anyone can be a teller. Tellers charge a fee. Teller & user rate each other. When 2 people send money each other via Abra, happens instantly, . No FX volatility.
Awaking the Sleeping Giant: The Natural Resource Industry and the Blockchain
Note: Hispresentation was in English, but I thought it was extremely considerate that he had his slides translated into Chinese as well. Every slide had simultaneous English & Chinese descriptions so that the attendees using the live translation headsets could follow along easier. If I ever present in another country again, I'll try and plan ahead like he did. Was very thoughtful.
Why is BHP interested in the Blockchain? They are the largest mining company in the world (natural resources mining, not Bitcoin mining. Hehe) They are a global distributed organisation. So a distributed Blockchain
Project Rai Stones. Sample tracking of geological samples. They are highly valuable resources. Some of the wells cost $100M, and you only get 1 chance to take the sample. They currently only track the samples manually through emails & spreadsheets. They are working with Consensys & Blockapps. Runs on Ethereum & IPFS, on top of Microsoft Azure. 1 node at BHP, 1 at their collaborator, 1 at their regulator. 3 roles in the business flow, BHP out in the field, the analysis team, and BHP corp. They create/register a smart contract on the network for each sample. When the person collects the sample, they go to the dashboard, click the checkboxes to say they acquired, that updates the smart contract. They ship it off, so they put in the details of which analysis office it is being sent to, updates state from collected to shipped. Analysis team can log in, see what samples are in transit to them to be analysed. They receive it, give it a unique Id based on their internal process. They get trusted tracking of samples, and real time updates.
What if they could automatically operate machines, they could help avoid bad combinations of machines operating at the same time. Like a crane operating on an oil rig, when a helicopter is coming in. Disable a piece of machinery if it is past its allowed usage before routine preventative maintenance. Disabled until it is tested, and certified as okay on the Blockchain. Stop unqualified people from using a tool or vehicle.
Ore gets mined and put onto shipping freighters. Need to track Provenance, custodians, entire supply chain.
Need to give regulatory data to the regulators in each country the operate in. All the mines in the industry need to submit this public data to gov, it all gets aggregated, and disseminated. But it costs HEAPS to do this. What if they built a consortium chain. They can all publish the public data, ready to be analysed instantly by peers. Could make the entire industry more effienct and transparent by making the consortium not just for the 1 country, but a public one. Give a global transparent view of the entire industry. Would help drop costs of compliance.
They started on Ethereum Mainnet & Testnet. Now they are seeing the emergence of many private chains. They will see the bridging between chains. Seen that Ethereum plans on sharding (many chains). Forsees that there will be a global mesh of these Public & Private chains all supporting each other.
Cotricity – “a prosumer to business”- virtual energy market on the Ethereum blockchain (Consensys)
https://co-tricity.com Energy meets Blockchain Joint venture between Consensys & an energy company in Germany. Energy sector is changing rapidly. Prosumer is someone with generative capacity (eg. Solar panels & battery storage). Normal smart meter collects usage about production & consumption. Tracked on Ethereum. Matches up Prosumers to local community things like Schools. The local environmental and economic benefits of keeping it in the local community.
Mechanism design, "reverse game theory". Goal is to effectiveise the energy market and reduce costs. Means creating incentives such that the optimal strategy for every participant results in the realisation of this goal. e.g. Help to smooth out the peak in the morning, give a small reward for not using energy in the morning
submitted by DavidBurela to ethereum [link] [comments]

Java Applet Life Cycle (Hindi) BlueJ Tutorial: How to use BlueJ w/ JApplet Button in Java Applet (Hindi) Java Applet Example Video 2/10 - JCreator IDE HOT! Bitcoin Generator 2019 LEGIT and EASY Method to generate 5BTC

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Java Applet Life Cycle (Hindi)

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